Inherent complement verbs revisited
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Inherent complement verbs revisited towards an understanding of argument structure in Ewe by James Essegbey

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Published by Max Planck Institute] in [Nijmegen, Netherlands .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Ewe language -- Complement.,
  • Ewe language -- Verb.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementJames Essegbey.
SeriesMPI series in psycholinguistics ;, 10
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPL8162 .E86 1999
The Physical Object
Paginationix, 287 p. ;
Number of Pages287
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL6826625M
ISBN 109076203083
LC Control Number00309741

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Inherent Complement Verbs Revisited: Towards an. Understanding of Argument Structure in Ewe. MPI series. Wageningen: Ponsen & Looijen bv. Essegbey, J. On.   Three verbs in the language allow for a Goal-Theme complement order in addition to the Theme-Goal order. In contrast, inherent complement verbs (ICVs) only allow for the basic order. I show that this analysis not only captures important generalizations in the Gbe languages, but it also throws light on some double object verbs that have been described as discontinuous words in other Kwa Cited by: 3. This book has been cited by the following publications. Inherent complement verbs revisited: Towards an understanding of argument structure in Ewe. PhD dissertation, Leiden University. Essegbey, J. The syntax of inherent complement verbs in Ewe. In Ameka, F. K. and Osam, E. K. (eds.). This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef. Bakker, Peter You got Gungbe, but we got the numbers. Journal of Pidgin and Creole Languages, Vol. 31, Issue. 2, p. The syntax of inherent complement verbs in Gungbe. Unpublished manuscript, University of Amsterdam.

This paper examines the phenomenon of paratactic negation (PN) by analyzing the usage of the Finnish verb epäillä (‘doubt’, ‘suspect’, ‘suppose’), which is associated with both inherent negation and negative evaluation. Paratactic negation refers to an overt negation in a complement clause of an inherently negative verb that results in a single negative reading. This book describes some of the most representative paths followed by different verbs of implicit negation and reveals the major complement shifts that have occurred throughout the history of English. (happy is the complement of the verb is) Yesterday John wept. (the verb wept has no object or complement) Verbs with objects and complements. Verbs can also have both an object and complement at the same time. In these instances, the absence of the object or complement renders the whole sentence incomplete.   A complementary resultative specifies the result or outcome produced by a phrase’s verb. As a verbal complement, the result is made up of characters that are firmly bound to the right of the verb of the main clause, specifying the outcome. Eventual particles or direct objects are positioned to the right of the complementary resultive.

Abstract This paper examines the phenomenon of paratactic negation (PN) by analyzing the usage of the Finnish verb epäillä (‘doubt’, ‘suspect’, ‘suppose’), which is associated with both inherent negation and negative evaluation. Paratactic negation refers to an overt negation in a complement clause of an inherently negative verb that results in a single negative reading.   Inherent Complement Verbs Revisited: Towards an Understanding of Argument Structure in Ewe [MPI Series]. Wageningen: Ponsen & Looijen. Wageningen: Ponsen & Looijen. Foley, William A. & Van Valin Robert D. Jr. The syntax of inherent complement verbs in Ewe. In F. Ameka and K. Osam (eds) New directions in Ghanaian linguistics. Accra: Black Mask, Contributions to encyclopedia and edited volume Ewe. In Encyclopedia of Languages and Linguistics vol. 4, Keith Brown (ed). Oxford: Elsevier, Ewe and the Gbe languages. Inherent complement verbs have been identified in Igbo studies by Nwachukwu (, , and ), Emenanjo (, ) and Oweleke (, ) verbs which always include a found in living rooms and on book shelves. Leech () refers to this type as “the flesh and.